Types Of Pointing


Types Of Pointing:

The choice of particular type of pointing depends upon the type of masonry, nature of the structure and the nature of the finish desired. The various types of pointing commonly used are described below:

1. Flush Pointing.

2. Cut Or Weathered Or Struck Pointing.


3. Keyed Or Grooved Pointing.

4. V-grooved Pointing.

5. Tuck Pointing.

6. Beaded Pointing.

1. Flush Pointing:

In this type of pointing, the mortar is pressed into the raked joints and finished off flush with the edges of the bricks or stones, so as to give a smooth appearance. The edges are then nearly trimmed with a trowel and straight edge. This is the simplest type of pointing and is extensively used in work and stone masonry face work.

2. Cut Or weathered Or Struck Pointing:

In this type of pointing, the mortar is first pressed into raked joints. While the mortar is still green, the top of the horizontal joints is neatly pressed back by 3 to 6 mm with the pointing tool. Thus the joint is finished sloping from the top of the joint to its bottom.

3. Keyed Or Grooved Pointing:

In this type of pointing, the mortar is pressed into the raked joints and finished off flush with the face of the wall. While the pressed mortar is still green, a groove is formed by running the bent end of a small steel rod (6 mm in the diameter) straight along the center line of the joints. The vertical joints are also finished in the same manner.

4. V-grooved Pointing:

This type of pointing is made similar to keyed or grooved pointing by suitably shaping the end of the steel rod to be used for forming the groove.

5. Tuck Pointing:

In this type of pointing, the mortar is first pressed in the raked joints and after it is finished flush with the face of the wall. While the pressed mortar is still green, the top and bottom edges of the joints are cut parallel so as to have a uniformly raised band about 6 mm high and 10 mm in width.

6. Beaded Pointing:

In this type of pointing, the mortar is pressed in the raked joints and finished off flush with the face of the wall. While the pressed mortar is still green, a steel rod having its end suitable shaped is run straight along the center line of the joints to form the beading.

Also Read- Difference Between Plastering And Pointing.
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